toggle

AAPL Stock: 117.86 ( -0.77 )

Printed from http://www.macnn.com

Google claim on Nexus 7 versus iPad popularity seen as false

updated 09:30 pm EDT, Tue July 30, 2013

Ad giant relied on limited study that didn't consider main sales outlets

Advertising giant Google has been revealed to have deliberately used a flawed study in an effort to make its Nexus 7 tablet look more popular. During the launch of the latest Nexus 7, a Google executive showed figures that "proved" that the Nexus 7 was the most popular tablet in Japan, outselling the iPad. This has now been debunked with the revelation that the study by Japanese market research firm BCN did not include iPad sales from any of Japan's seven Apple Stores, its two largest telecom partners, or Apple's direct online channel.

While the exact percentage of iPads sold through these channels is unknown, it would certainly be a very significant percentage -- and shipment figures from the more-reliable research firm IDC suggest that during the period in question, Apple shipped more than twice as many iPads as Google did Nexus 7 units. Indeed, the BCN study only touched on 16 percent of the available tablet-carrying outlets in Japan -- and appears to have "gerrymandered" the stores it did cover to ensure a positive result for Google. The false claim was covered by most mainstream media sites, which simply reported the findings (though MacNN's own report expressed some skepticism, calling the figures "unique" among worldwide sales and shipment data).

In fact, Apple reported more recently that sales in Japan were up 60 percent year-over-year this spring, and during the period cited by the Google study, Apple's Japan sales overall were up 88 percent from the previous quarter and up 25 percent year-over-year. When combined with IDC's shipment data, the numbers make it clear that the selective BCN study was designed to mislead.

Google's use of the false claim casts further doubt on its infrequently-updated activation claims, which likely include any device running any version of Android -- counting, for example, Chinese state-made devices that have no contact with Google services or stores beyond simply running Android as the OS, as well as Amazon's non-Google Android variant for the Kindle and Kindle Fire. The company now claims around 1.4 million activations per day, and expects to hit one billion total activations sometime in the late summer or early fall of this year.

Of these, Google says that 70 million of the activations have come from Android tablets, with 50 million of that figure having been activated in the last year. The numbers are meant to offer a window into potential end-user sales rather than shipments, but are difficult to verify as seemingly few of these activated tablets ever access the Internet.

Apple has sold about 148 million iPads since its debut, or more than double the sum total of all Android tablet activations. This figure roughly corresponds to the ratio of iPad shipments to Nexus 7 shipments to Japan during the calendar fourth quarter of 2012 -- 773,000 to 350,000.




by MacNN Staff

POST TOOLS:

TAGS :

toggle

Comments

  1. iphonerulez

    Dedicated MacNNer

    Joined: 11-28-08

    What difference does it make if Google is lying or not? They're either selling them or they're not. If they're not making the money on those tablets all those lies are going to be caught in the long run. Who is Google trying to impress? If they build good tablets consumers will probably buy them. It seems rather simple. Anyone can see Apple is making money each quarter no matter how much the news media wants to deny it. Sure, Apple product sales can dip and profits can drop, but their bank account is still extremely solid. Apple's growth seems to be slowing, but that's just how the economy goes. All Google can talk about is their tens of millions of activations of $150 tablets. Good for them.

  1. Charles Martin

    MacNN Editor

    Joined: 08-04-01

    Because perception counts for a lot when much of the market you're selling to doesn't have the technical ability to discern which is the best choice for them.

    Apple's image with the public is one of premium stuff at premium prices. The perception on Google products is "good enough for gov't work, and cheap." I think you'd agree that there are cases for both companies where the perception just isn't true.

    Consequently, Apple spends a good deal of its time trying to convince people that they are a better VALUE for money, since they can't compete on price alone in most cases. Meanwhile Google tries to convince people that their tablets are more popular than they actually are, because nobody wants to buy a tablet that's not well-supported and frankly -- at present -- most Android tablets are not well-supported.

  1. Spheric Harlot

    Clinically Insane

    Joined: 11-07-99

    Originally Posted by iphonerulezView Post

    What difference does it make if Google is lying or not? They're either selling them or they're not. If they're not making the money on those tablets all those lies are going to be caught in the long run. Who is Google trying to impress? If they build good tablets consumers will probably buy them. It seems rather simple. Anyone can see Apple is making money each quarter no matter how much the news media wants to deny it. Sure, Apple product sales can dip and profits can drop, but their bank account is still extremely solid. Apple's growth seems to be slowing, but that's just how the economy goes. All Google can talk about is their tens of millions of activations of $150 tablets. Good for them.



    It's well-known that people don't vote for a perceived loser, nor do they buy a product that is perceived to be losing, even if it is the provably better product.

    If a product is talked up and the impression is generated that it is selling really well, more people will buy it.

    This is a big part of how Samsung's success in the smartphone market worked, and why Samsung worked so hard at talking up their numbers by stuffing the channels with inventory they knew they had no chance of selling.
    Even if they were found to be inflated by four or five times within a few months, the reports that Samsung shipped millions of devices made them seem like a relevant player at a time when they definitely were not.
    It worked.

  1. DiabloConQueso

    Fresh-Faced Recruit

    Joined: 06-11-08

    "since they can't compete on price alone in most cases."

    Not can't -- won't.

  1. Flying Meat

    Dedicated MacNNer

    Joined: 01-25-07

    It's also well known that people make generalizations. If you have more than one person, then you have people. Saying "people this" or "people that" really isn't providing any more information than "It is widely known" that more than one person "doesn't..."

    Next time you hear a politician or pundit claim "Americans want..." ask yourself, how many?

  1. Charles Martin

    MacNN Editor

    Joined: 08-04-01

    Diablo: no, it's can't -- not won't.

    It times a lot of time and money to create an original operating system. It takes a LOT less time and money to grab code and "concepts" from Apple and Java and cobble it together into Android. It takes yet still less time and money to bring out craptastic products running a free operating system, which is what the majority of Android phones are.

    The very few competing phones that are really on anything near Apple's level are -- ta da! -- the same price or more. See also tablets, all-in-one computers and ultrabooks. I for one do not fault Apple for not selling at a loss as *every single company* except Samsung is doing in the phone and tablet business.

Login Here

Not a member of the MacNN forums? Register now for free.

toggle

Network Headlines

toggle

Most Popular

MacNN Sponsor

Recent Reviews

Plantronics BackBeat Pro Bluetooth headphones

Looking for a pair of headphones that can do everything a user requires is a task that can take some study. Trying to decide on in-ear ...

MaxUpgrades 512GB Retina MacBook Pro SSD

Apple's Retina line of MacBook Pro notebooks have been impressive, right from their debut in 2012. Thinner than the previous model, t ...

Lemur BlueDriver

"Oh no, the check engine light is on…again! What one of the hundreds of reasons could it be this time? Probably going to cost a for ...

toggle

Most Commented