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Lynch: Apple fostering 'negative campaigning' against Flash

updated 04:05 pm EST, Mon November 8, 2010

Content 'blockade' in effect

Many of the current attacks against Flash are unwarranted, claims Adobe CTO Kevin Lynch. Testing recently suggested that an 11-inch MacBook Air with Flash active can potentially lose up to two hours of battery life, although the constant cycling of Flash ads is believed to have been an aggravating factor in benchmarks. "It's a false argument to make, of the power usage," says Lynch in a new interview. "When you're displaying content, any technology will use more power to display, versus not displaying content. If you used HTML5, for example, to display advertisements, that would use as much or more processing power than what Flash uses."

Lynch argues that HTML5 has less reliable playback, and that several studies have confirmed better battery life for Flash. The executive is said to have a bigger problem, however, with Apple's active stance against Flash, which has only loosened slightly in recent months.

"I just think there's this negative campaigning going on, and, for whatever reason, Apple is really choosing to incite it, and condone it," Lynch remarks. "I think that's unfortunate. We don't think it's good for the web to have aspects closed off -- a blockade of certain types of expression. There's a decade of content out there that you just can't view on Apple's device, and I think that's not only hurtful to Adobe, but hurtful to everyone that created that content.

"That's what upsets me the most," he continues. "That people put energy into making this stuff, and now some percentage of viewers can't see it anymore because one company chooses so. That's just totally counter to our values."

Lynch insists that Adobe is happy about the spread of HTML5, which can substitute for Flash in some cases. Apple began pushing the standard heavily when the iPad was introduced; like other iOS devices, the iPad is incapable of running Flash content. "We support HTML," says Lynch. We're making tools for HTML5. It's a great opportunity for us. Flash and HTML have co-existed, and they're going to continue to to co-exist."







by MacNN Staff

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Comments

  1. bdmarsh

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +27

    Apple doesn't need to

    People are seeing the negative effects on their own.

    Security issues, and battery drain.

    Sure HTML5 animation/video may use the same kind of power (in some cases more), and those that notice this will be looking for plug-ins/extensions for their browser to make these animations optional.

    Even on a desktop where power usage isn't an issue, I do notice the performance issues when flash is on. I'll likely notice this again when HTML5 replaces flash for Ads, but until then, a flash blocking plugin is very nice.

  1. macman050366

    Joined: Dec 1969

    -2

    Harry Potter

    Is their CTO Harry Potter? He kind of looks like him....LOL

  1. doctor9

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +28

    What a crock!!

    The fact is Apple has called out the white elephant in the middle of the room, and instead of having any positive evidence to show the counter, the best Adobe can do is become spin doctors.

    So cry me a river about your inferior products, Lynch!

    /

  1. Jeronimo2000

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +29

    Haha

    "Lynch argues that HTML5 has less reliable playback..."

    This comes just minutes after I tried watching a Flash video on my i7 iMac and quit in the middle of it because it was unwatchable with all the stuttering. There's no "less reliable playback" than Flash.

  1. nostrademas

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +17

    No campaigning required

    Adobe need to live in the real world. A number of their products are beginning to suffer from years of them assuming that they're the best and that everyone needs and will pay a premium for them. Flash Player may be free, the authoring tools aren't. They make a lot of money from that but it's let the designers go out of control. I hate Flash web sites where it's gratuitous effects that add nothing (not even a good look) to the content. While it's still normal to find a "Skip intro" link on sites, unfortunately fewer sites now have non-Flash versions where the developer can't be bothered to present content in an accessible way. Adverts are obviously a whole other story as well.

    Unfortunately Flash does chew processor cycles on Macs, and does have a measurable impact on battery. Lynch makes the mistake of not recognising the difference between presenting content, and presenting effects. The former we have to live with, the latter is the bane of the web.

  1. Flying Meat

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +23

    Lynch says

    Everything is crappy. Our product is just one among many crappy products. Therefore, we will continue letting it be so. In the mean time please stop telling everyone that our stuff is crappy.

    "a blockade of certain types of expression. There's a decade of content out there that you just can't view on Apple's device, and I think that's not only hurtful to Adobe, but hurtful to everyone that created that content. "

    wow. What a despicable self-serving spin of partial information.
    First, the blockade does not exists except for iPhones and iPads, where performance of Flash is a major sticking point between Apple and Adobe. It will probably work it's flabby/bloated way onto these devices eventually, one way or another.
    Second, The "decade of content" reference inflates its importance by the intentional omission of the word Flash. A decade of Flash content.
    Third, "that you just can't view on Apple's device" is another falsehood, since someone did install flash on the device. Otherwise, there would be no benchmarks to point to.

    Even if you put these arguments into the larger context, the obvious point of whether or not this "decade of content" -- these "certain types of expression" -- is in any real way useful to the end user, won't be addressed. That goes for Flash, as well as HTML5 advertising content.

  1. jfelbab

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +17

    Oh, really?

    "Lynch: Apple fostering 'negative campaigning' against Flash

    Many of the current attacks against Flash are unwarranted, claims Adobe CTO Kevin Lynch. Testing recently suggested that an 11-inch MacBook Air with Flash active can potentially lose up to two hours of battery life, although the constant cycling of Flash ads is believed to have been an aggravating factor in benchmarks. "It's a false argument to make, of the power usage," says Lynch in a new interview."

    What Lynch seems to have missed is that this was a CNET test not an Apple test. CNET discovered the loss of 2 hours of battery life by surfing with Flash installed, not Apple.

    I also observed yet another Flash security update this past week. Another in a very long line of security holes with this product.

    I would suggest to Lynch... either make your products better or perish.

  1. mhartt

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +22

    Let me see if I understand this

    1.) Ars Technica conducts an independent test that shows a MacBook Air using Flash has a 30% shorter battery life than when viewing the same content without Flash, and

    2.) Kevin Lynch blames Apple.

    I think Mr. Lynch missed his calling. He should be in politics.

    Comment buried. Show
  1. ilovestevejobs

    Joined: Dec 1969

    -34

    Well there's your problem...

    ...You've got a Mac. Welcome to the Apple Experience >:)

    Comment buried. Show
  1. lamewing

    Joined: Dec 1969

    -24

    What part of this don't you people get?

    In the end, if we replace all of the advertisements that are flash-based with those that are HTML5-based....we would still loose the same amount of battery life on our devices. The mere existence of the ads are the problem in the first place, not so much the format that they are distributed.

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