toggle

AAPL Stock: 102.47 ( + 2.71 )

Printed from http://www.macnn.com

Q1 Mac sales estimated at 3.3 million units

updated 09:40 am EST, Mon January 4, 2010

Figure would set Apple sales record

Apple is estimated to have sold 3.3 million Macs during its most recent fiscal quarter, according to Broadpoint.AmTech analyst Brian Marshall. Should the figure prove correct, it will break an all-time sales record of 3.05 million Macs, set during the previous quarter. It will also mark a growth of 31 percent year-over-year, up from 2.3 million.

The company has not seen similar levels of growth since 2008, which produced leaps ranging from 21 to 51 percent. Marshall also suggests that the recent quarter should mark another surge in Apple's desktop sales, which could be up 19 percent year-over-year at 865,000 units. Most growth in recent quarters has been attributed to MacBooks.

Official results should be released sometime in the second half of January, in tandem with a results call. Apple is like to continue outpacing industry average growth for 20 out of the last 21 quarters, the one blemish being the first quarter of 2009, when the full impact of economic recession hit the public. Gartner research estimates suggest that worldwide computer sales grew by just 2.3 percent last year.




by MacNN Staff

POST TOOLS:

TAGS :

toggle

Comments

  1. wings_rfs

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +1

    Outpacing Also Equals Falling the Least

    "Apple is like to continue outpacing industry average growth for 20 out of the last 21 quarters, the one blemish being the first quarter of 2009, when the full impact of economic recession hit the public."

    Wait just a minute. That sentence implies that Apple did not outpace the industry growth that quarter. While everything fell, Apple fell the least, right? That's still outpacing the industry.

  1. Constable Odo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +1

    Analysts looking at Apple tend to only

    concern themselves about Apple beating its own quarterly numbers. It doesn't matter whether the rest of the industry or economy is down. When Apple dropped down to $85, it didn't matter that its sales hadn't dropped off as much as the rest of the computer industry. It only mattered that sales were down for Apple more than the previous quarters. Analysts don't seem to take the whole economy or industry into perspective when rating Apple. There was never a good reason for Apple's share price to erode as much as it did.

    I'd gotten used to analysts assuming that since Apple products cost more, the company will suffer more than the rest of the tech industry in an economic recession and base Apple's share price on that assumption.

    Even though Apple is breaking sales records quarter after quarter and outpacing the industry in general, its share price really hasn't moved up much since December 2007. If Apple sales were only slightly higher than the general industry, the share price would likely drop like an anvil. Apple will have a blowout quarter and add about $2 billion in cash reserve, but I'm willing to wager the stock goes up less than 5%. It's not gonna pull an Amazon jump, for sure.

  1. testudo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    -1

    Re: Analysts looking

    Analysts looking at Apple tend to only concern themselves about Apple beating its own quarterly numbers. It doesn't matter whether the rest of the industry or economy is down.

    For what reason at all could looking at them compared to the rest of the industry matter? The stock price is basically based off of (a) the performance of the company, and (b) the outlook of the company. Apple's value is not affected if Dell sells more or less computers any quarter. The stock price might swing on such news, but only because buyers/sellers look at like industries to get an idea. If Dell is down, Apple, HP, etc. might also be down. So Sell Sell Sell. But if Apple announces their forecasts are still on target, their price will go back up where it was.

    When Apple dropped down to $85, it didn't matter that its sales hadn't dropped off as much as the rest of the computer industry. It only mattered that sales were down for Apple more than the previous quarters. Analysts don't seem to take the whole economy or industry into perspective when rating Apple. There was never a good reason for Apple's share price to erode as much as it did.

    Apple's stock went down because ALL stocks went down. Sell-offs and panics are just that. They have no basis in reality just like huge rallies have no basis in reality. To whine that 'analysts' were to blame completely misses the point, as they weren't the ones saying "Apple is only worth $90, sell now!".

    Besides that, Apple's stock is based on thoughts of future growth potential (otherwise there'd be no way it would be trading with a P/E at 34 and a market cap at $190 Billion). If Apple's growth stalls at any point, the brokers are going to start asking question and you'll see the price start to fall. That's the way it works.

Login Here

Not a member of the MacNN forums? Register now for free.

toggle

Network Headlines

toggle

Most Popular

MacNN Sponsor

Recent Reviews

Kenu Airframe Plus

Simple, stylish and effective, the Kenu Airframe + portable car mount is the latest addition to Kenu's lineup. Released earlier this ...

Plantronics Rig Surround 7.1 headset

Trying to capture the true soundscape of video games can be a daunting task. Looking to surround-sound home theater options, users hav ...

Adesso Compagno X Bluetooth keyboard

The shift from typing on physical keyboards to digital versions on smartphones and tablets hasn't been an easy for many consumers. Fr ...

toggle

Most Commented