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Apple to investigate cases of exploding iPhones

updated 11:00 am EDT, Tue August 18, 2009

Exploding iPhone reports

Apple is looking into media stories of one or more exploding iPhones in Europe, according to European Commission spokeswoman Helen Kearns. Reuters notes that in in France, a teenager says he was injured when his iPhone shattered, shortly after it began making a hissing noise. Although Apple has only stated that it is waiting for the damaged phones before making a judgment, it is noted to be in contact with the Commission.

"Apple have come back to us...and what they've said to us is that they consider these are isolated incidents. They don't consider that there's a general problem," says Kearns. "They're trying to get more information on the specific details of those incidents (reported in the media) and they will do tests as necessary to investigate the possible cause."

The iPhone problems echo similar ones reported with iPods, which have in some cases hurt people and damaged property. Apple has at times described the iPod incidents as isolated as well, and actively tried to quiet talk of them. The company fought a TV investigation into American iPod fires, and asked for silence as part of a proposed settlement over an English iPod touch.




by MacNN Staff

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Comments

  1. JuanGuapo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +3

    Well..

    Not to stick up for Apple, but a few out of millions and millions of units is hardly cause for concern.

  1. Feathers

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +3

    Ditto...

    ...plus the fact that the claimants in the UK story wouldn't give the faulty iPod to Apple for testing and analysis purposes. Whilst it is understandable that individuals may be cautious about handing over their "evidence", how on earth can Apple determine the cause of the problem without getting a look at the device? A bit of journalistic balance would be nice... so would a few beers on a warm day!

  1. TiberiusMonkey

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +2

    I agree.

    And for every unit that does have a problem, I would question just what the user had/was doing to it before the problem. The fuss made over some of the reports "zomg Apple wanted the phone back and wouldn't just take instant liability based only on our word" was silly.

    Having said that though, even just one unit having a genuine problem is one too many and a potentially dangerous one that needs looking at.

  1. Roehlstation

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +3

    Curious...

    What were they using to charge the iPhone

  1. ff11

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +1

    All well and good

    It's understandable that Apple couldn't reach a conclusion this early after only a couple of incidents (and where it seems they did not have access to the actual phones), but you are going to have people using various devices to charge their phones (h***, even the Apple Store itself sells 3rd party chargers).

    The only way to get more control on this is to have an "Apple approved" label on such peripherals.

  1. testudo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    -1

    Re: Ditto

    ...plus the fact that the claimants in the UK story wouldn't give the faulty iPod to Apple for testing and analysis purposes.

    I recall the story saying they wanted Apple to come and pick it up, but they weren't going to mail it in. I don't know whether Apple was going to pay for the postage. But I don't think they were against 'turning it over', either.

  1. testudo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    -1

    Re: I agree

    And for every unit that does have a problem, I would question just what the user had/was doing to it before the problem.

    And just can one do with an iPhone or iPod where the outcome of "It caught on fire" is acceptable?

    Sure, if they were blasting it with a blowtorch, I can see that. But besides that? Is there something in the manual that says "Don't toss it in the air, as it causes a risk for fire!".

  1. ff11

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +1

    re: Re: I agree

    I haven't actually looked, but I bet there is something in there about proper charging. You will find that warning even on packages of rechargable batteries.

  1. testudo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    re: I agree

    And what do you think they were doing? Hooking up the iPhone to a 10,000 volt power line?

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