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Syncode calls for better App Store evaluation policy

updated 10:45 am EDT, Sat July 18, 2009

Syncode App evaluation

Syncode has posted information regarding the approval process for its application, iTweetReply, at the App Store and calls for more transparent and faster app evaluations. The developer submitted its application for evaluation on June 9th and did not receive approval until July 10th. Syncode believes an Apple tester viewed the login screen and stopped short of testing the rest of the application. A few days later Apple sent the developers an email suggesting the application was taking longer than expected to evaluate.

Apple did not contact Syncode until the 24th to say the app had been rejected on the basis that there was an unwanted address shown in the Splash Screen of the app. Syncode believes Apple took issue with the screen when the tester originally previewed the app nearly a month before.

The iTweetReply app was resubmitted and approved another two and a half weeks later on July 10th. Syncode hopes stories such as this will lessen and Apple will implement a more transparent app evaluation process.




by MacNN Staff

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Comments

  1. mr100percent

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +1

    unwanted address?

    Why is that fictional address "unwanted?" What does it matter to Apple?

  1. thomqi

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    overreacting spoiled brat

    15 days is not "nearly a month", and it was not the first time they were contacted.

    There are other developers besides themselves, and there are more apps being submitted for evaluation everyday. If they don't like the wait, then maybe they should pick a different platform that isn't getting so much attention. They might also consider being a little more original, or more generic, instead of cribbing from Apple's image.

    The call for transparency is just a repeat of media lingo to get an emotional reaction and sympathy. They were not rejected without explanation, and they were informed as soon it was determined that an immediate answer wasn't available, likely because whoever the people were that had to provide the answer were busy answering other questions previously submitted.

    Get real! 6.8 billion people on the planet and Syncode thinks they should get exclusive attention?! Sheesh... They should take some accountability for their own decisions and quit blaming Apple for not treating Syncode as if they were the only people on the planet.

  1. Donevan

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +2

    JAID or JASD

    JAID... Just another impatient developer.
    JASD... Just another stupid developer.

    Let's see: developer submits application. Developer 'thinks' maybe the splash screen caused a delay. Developer apparently too stupid to draw that same conclusion before submitting and avoiding the hassle. Developer now wants to let the world know how stupid he/she was in causing their own delay.

    Apple obviously has very basic flags that derail submissions for secondary review. Using Apple's own promotional personality's name on the splash screen was stupid and the developer thoroughly deserved the hassle. In any application process, if a submission violates basic flags, the application is rerouted for secondary review. In other words it goes from the top of the initial reviewer's pile to the bottom of the secondary level reviewer's pile. Once that secondary reviewer actions the problem, the application goes back to the initial reviewer for customer contact, again to the bottom of the pile. What might have taken days now takes weeks. This is the same in any corporate review culture.

    Impatient, spoiled, stupid, naive, uninformed, amateurish... pick the adjective here. They all fit.

  1. Bobfozz

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    No Sympathy

    Some (many?) developers are out to "win the lottery." With as many apps. as Apple has, break it down. If it was 50,000 for 1 year, as an example, that's 137 applications per week or 27 per day. Apple probably has 3-5 "testers," or on average 5 per tester per day. Assuming lunch, etc. that's testing one every 1.5 hours. These people like Syncode are self-indulgent pigs. Putting an Apple logo on the screen was not too brilliant--delay city.

    No sympathy.

    But it's not just them, lots of these "geeks" with internet connections, and no previous business sense, react like this. I have cretins like this who will call and ask where their order is that they "sent in 2 weeks ago" when the postage markings show it was 3-4 days ago! Mental midgets.

    No sympathy.

  1. testudo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +1

    Crybabies

    Not these people, all you Apple-defenders who apparently feel any negative press of Apple is also negative towards you, and you feel you must defend the mother-company or your honor will be lost.

    And none of this would be a problem if it weren't for Apple's insistence that all apps have to get approved for sale. I'm sure if Apple did this for OS X five years ago, you'd all have been cheering and claiming it was a great idea too.

  1. testudo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +1

    Re: JAID or JASD

    Let's see: developer submits application. Developer 'thinks' maybe the splash screen caused a delay. Developer apparently too stupid to draw that same conclusion before submitting and avoiding the hassle.

    Sorry, but that's wrong. Developer realized that AFTER they got back the rejected notice. But I'm sure you're such a smart developer you think of everything before you submit anything.

    In any application process, if a submission violates basic flags, the application is rerouted for secondary review.

    What kind of asinine application process have you worked on? If the appication violates some basic flags, you kick it out. The secondary review process is for those that pass the basic stuff.

    You don't go "Hmm, this is obviously wrong. Let's stick it in a pile and review it carefully later." You go "Nope. Not right. Rejected!" and get it off the list as quickly as possible.

    In other words it goes from the top of the initial reviewer's pile to the bottom of the secondary level reviewer's pile. Once that secondary reviewer actions the problem, the application goes back to the initial reviewer for customer contact, again to the bottom of the pile. What might have taken days now takes weeks. This is the same in any corporate review culture.

    And that's why nothing ever gets done in the corporate world, I guess. But, again, why is it going to the secondary reviewer when the primary guy already knows it was wrong and could easily have dealt with it?

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