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MobileMe users victimized in another phishing scam

updated 09:15 pm EST, Wed February 11, 2009

Another MobileMe scam

MobileMe users have been victimized in another phishing scam designed to steal their credit card information, according to Macworld. The criminals followed a similar plan to the scams reported in August and September of last year, distributing an e-mail disguised as genuine communication from Apple. The recent e-mail told readers their annual subscription was up for renewal, but that "attempts to charge your credit card have failed." The provided link then navigated to a malicious site that asked for credit card information.

The phishing scam in August used a similar tactic of establishing a billing problem. Thieves have taken great care to produce messages that appear to be genuine, including courteous and professional wording and even a number of legitimate Apple links in the mail.

Customers are urged to be very cautious of any links or e-mail messages that ask for credit card or banking information.




by MacNN Staff

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  1. testudo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    -13

    OMG!

    I can't believe you people reported this! Now that this idea has been revealed, nefarious peoples are going to be trying to email unsuspecting people trying to scam other information, like Paypal info, bank info, credit card info, social security numbers. In fact, this here article might just start a whole new industry of people trying to steal other's identities!!!

    Or, to put it another way, since when is phishing emails and web-sites considered 'news'? Wouldn't news be something like "Today, there's been no attempt to phish or steal information from people all across the world..."

  1. tinytim

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +3

    funny .me email address

    I got one of these today, and the thing that tips this scam off is the email address it comes from:

    lydiawhynoreply@me.com

    If you are going to try this, the return address has to be a little more believable.

  1. MeandmyMac

    Joined: Dec 1969

    -2

    One word...

    Lifelock!

  1. nat

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    yeah

    that's right, don't tell people there's a new one out there. one warning is enough for anybody.

    news would be if you posted something that was intelligent, kept to the subject, didn't bash apple or a poster or someone's thoughts or had any relevance whatsoever. news would be if you acted like you really didn't know everything there is to know. news would be that chip on your shoulder falling off.

    yes, THAT would be news.

  1. testudo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    -6

    Re: yeah

    So everytime there's a piece of phishing email, we need big articles on the subject every time there's a new one? And is it limited to Mobile Me? Or to anything that's related to mac users?

  1. Guest

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +2

    Vicitms or targets?

    The story indicates that MobileMe users are being victimized. Are we really victims or just targets?

    While this may seem like splitting hairs, it's really a very important distinction. News agencies really should take more care when choosing the words used in the stories.

    I, as a MobileMe user, would be a possible target of this sort of scheme, however I would only be a victim if I actually failed to recognize the scam and clicked on the link and filled out the form.

    Andy Fore

  1. nat

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    of course not

    "So everytime there's a piece of phishing email, we need big articles on the subject..."

    and all those articles reporting the windows virus that hit millions and millions of computers a few weeks back were just ridiculous. i mean, c'mon! this stuff happens all the time, why all those big articles on the subject every time there's a new one! just ridiculous i tell ya. really.

  1. UberFu

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    I'm sorry...

    ...but after 15 years of the modern public internet and people are still falling for stupid tactics to be scammed out of their cash - then it becomes shame on them for not reading the header information and or verifying where the eMail came from before the blindly whip out their credit cards and start tossing money here and there.

    Sorry - No sympathy!

    Sounds like 20 and 30 and 40 year old adults need to grow up [or grow a pair and admit their own mess up]. They wouldn't take candy from a stranger on the street or jump into a window-less van if some stranger asked them to [aside from being at gun-point]. Can't blame the bad guy because you were dumb enough to eat the candy.

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