toggle

AAPL Stock: 113.99 ( + 1.98 )

Printed from http://www.macnn.com

Adobe: Lack of 64-bit support won't hurt CS4 for Mac

updated 08:40 am EDT, Tue September 23, 2008

No 64-bit CS4 for Mac

Though anticipated, some Mac users may still be disappointed at the lack of 64-bit support in Adobe Creative Suite 4. The suite was unveiled late Monday -- and while Windows users will be able to take full advantage of their 64-bit machines, Mac users will have to wait at least until the release of CS5. Still, the company says Mac users will see performance increases in the new version, because of OpenGL support, enhanced interfaces and other improvements.

Adobe decided to pass on 64-bit code because of Apple's switch from Carbon to Cocoa development frameworks. Because Adobe's apps are written in Carbon, the switch to Cocoa would require a complete rewrite. But the addition of OpenGL support -- allowing CS4 apps to make use of graphics processors -- should provide significant performance boosts, according to Bruce Bowman, Product Manager of Adobe Premiere Pro. In an interview with MacNN, Bowman said he thinks the additional graphics horsepower will provide more noticeable benefit than 64-bit processing, by decreasing render times and upgrading 3D graphics. The time and expense of recoding all of the CS4 applications in Cocoa forced Adobe to delay 64-bit support for the Mac, Bowman said. He would not comment on when such support might be added.

The company synchronized the release of all CS4 products -- Windows and Mac versions -- on the same day to "ensure compatibility" between the platforms. In previous releases, the Windows version was released first, followed by a Mac version months later. Instead of including a host of splashy new features, this release of Creative Suite focuses on efficiency. Bowman says CS4 sports a more consistent user interface and improved workflow options, allowing content to be easily moved between applications.




by MacNN Staff

POST TOOLS:

TAGS :

toggle

Comments

  1. Guest

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +6

    Bad code

    I don't claim to know anything about Adobe's code. And I do recognise that Apple bailed out on a 64 bit Carbon framework. But something in Adobe Labs smells like spaghetti to me because Carbon is mostly UI code.

    If the CS applications where designed in a way that the internal engine was abstracted from the user interface (by implementing the model-view-controller design paradigm, for example) then it might not be such a huge deal.

  1. Mimi-mim

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +7

    Behind the curve

    Good old Adobe. It seems that Adobe is always behind the curve, trying to update its applications to some new standard or architecture that everyone else adopted a few years ago.

    It doesn't seem to have hurt them.

    But it does seem that they write software with committees, rather than software developers.

  1. njfuzzy

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +7

    Well that was dumb

    I will be waiting for CS5. This just doesn't seem worth the upgrade, even from CS2.

  1. danrodney

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +1

    64bit not so huge

    Most of you commenting about how it sucks that CS4 is not 64bit will not even have enough ram to see any difference. As I understand it, the main difference is allowing more ram (I forget how much). But it's not the most important feature of an app. And as a designer and a programmer I understand how long it takes to recode apps. Apple (not Adobe) decided to change the development roadmap and surprised Adobe which thought there would be a 64bit Carbon. Adobe couldn't do all that recoding AND new features in time because Apple didn't give them enough notice of their changes. Honestly, there are many other features that are more important to me than 64bit. On a laptop that is a feature I can't take advantage of because of such limited ram. So stop looking for a scape goat, 64 bit is not a huge deal for most people. Granted some people with massive Photoshop images could use it, but most people can't so Adobe added features for MOST people rather than one feature only some can use. Once you understand the reality rather than the hype it's not that big of a deal.

    Comment buried. Show
  1. testudo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    -14

    Re: Behind the curve

    Good old Adobe. It seems that Adobe is always behind the curve, trying to update its applications to some new standard or architecture that everyone else adopted a few years ago.

    Yes, heaven forbid that a company decides not to completely rewrite their code base to some new architecture, which will cost a large amount of money that isn't recoupable (unless all of you were willing to pay for a CS4 that was exactly the same as CS3, but Cocoa-based and better 64-bit support).

    And expecting Adobe to spend the money, even though Apple promised them that their current architecture was going to be supported and enhanced. Well, they should know better than to listen to Apple.


    But it does seem that they write software with committees, rather than software developers.


    Oh, give me a break. If you left it up to software developers, they'd be rewriting code every year to gear to the "latest and greatest" technology, even if it offered no advantage.

    And if you look at the large, open-source projects, you'll note that they are designed by committee as well. Because committees look at what the software needs to do, not just what the developers think the software should do.

  1. jfelbab

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +4

    Cocoa New?

    Some new architecture? Yeah, back in 2003. Someone had their head buried in the sand to not see this was Apples direction.

  1. jfelbab

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +11

    Make that 2001

    Way back in 2001 Carbon was pushed a way to port your legacy applications to OSX and Cocoa was positioned as the next generation framework for development. This is a misstep by Adobe plain and simple

  1. JeffHarris

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +4

    So What?

    CS5 will be a good fit for Snow Leopard.
    That's what I'LL be waiting for.

    I always skip a version with Adobe. Their upgrades are way too incremental to warrant paying their robbery-like upgrade fees.

    I had 3 FULL version licenses (Photoshop, Acrobat and Illustrator), yet they would only accept ONE license toward the CS3 upgrade! Scummy.

  1. resuna

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +6

    Playing chicken

    I still think Adobe and Apple are just playing chicken with each other. They have been ever since Apple tried to force all the developers over to Yellow Box (the precursor to Cocoa) in Rhapsody, and Adobe refused to budge, and Apple blinked.

  1. Guest

    Joined: Dec 1969

    +4

    OpenGL WTH

    "But the addition of OpenGL support... by decreasing render times and upgrading 3D graphics."

    3D??? What 3D products does Adobe sell? The only 3D features I can think of are:
    - Illustrator's sorry a** 3D plugin.
    - Photoshop's new 3D in Extreme.
    - Aftereffects.
    And these are hardly common everyday features, many users never get to even use them. Ho could that be a more noticeable speed boost than 64 bit.

    BTW: On the Intel process 64Bit apps will run faster, it's on the G5 you won't see much improvement because the G5 processor has many open registers.

Login Here

Not a member of the MacNN forums? Register now for free.

toggle

Network Headlines

toggle

Most Popular

MacNN Sponsor

Recent Reviews

DoxieGo Portable Scanner

Sometimes, people need to scan things, but having a computer at hand to do so isn't exactly feasible. Maybe it's the home of a relat ...

Dell AD211 Bluetooth speaker

For all of the high-priced, over-engineered Bluetooth speakers in the electronics market, there is still room for mass-market solution ...

VisionTek 128GB USB Pocket SSD

USB flash drives dealt the death blow to both the floppy and Zip drives. While still faster than either of the old removable media, sp ...

toggle

Most Commented