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iJailbreak 0.4 for iPhone 1.1.3 released

updated 02:30 pm EST, Mon January 28, 2008

Jailbreak for iPhone 1.1.3

The 13-year-old software developer behind the open source 'iJailBreak' utility has released iJailBreak 0.4, an update to the software that allows iPhone and iPod touch users on jailbroken versions of firmware 1.1.1 or 1.1.2 to automatically update to and jailbreak the newly released 1.1.3 firmware. Users who currently have the previous version if iJailBreak installed should be notified of the new release and offered the ability to automatically update. iJailBreak is available from Google Code, with information available at iJailBreak.com. Late last week, the iPhone 1.1.3 jailbreak was publicly released (along with Mac and Windows versions of the utilities).

New to iJailBreak 0.4 is the iJailBreak News Flash section of the utility, which provides a tip or new packages to download.

The jailbreak process requires users to start on a jailbroken 1.1.1 or 1.1.2 device, and suggests that users with non-jailbroken 1.1.1 installations visit JailbreakMe.com to begin the process. Users with iPhone firmware 1.1.2 need to downgrade to 1.1.1 by following instructions posted at iJailBreak.com. Downgraded iPhones will appear deactivated, however the author is quick to note that jailbreaking the device will 're-activate' the iPhone.

"The actual jailbreaking process goes as follows: connect your device to your computer, open iJailBreak and click on the Jailbreak icon. Once iJailBreak tells you that it is finished, go into Settings->General on your device and set Auto-Lock to Never. Next, open Installer.app and install the '1.1.3 Soft Upgrade' package," AriX writes.

"This installation can take some time - maybe 5 or 10 minutes. Leaving your device alone at this point is fine and is encouraged. Once the installation is complete, the device should reboot. If your device hasn't rebooted automatically after 15 minutes, it's safe to reboot it manually. Your device will then boot into your new 1.1.3 installation."

All third-party applications are removed during this process, however their settings are left intact which will preserve any preferences or high scores once users reinstall the third-party applications.

What's more, iPod touch users will automatically receive the 'Software Upgrade' which normally costs $20. The update process is entirely legal, according to AriX, and is installed for free as part of the jailbreak procedure.




by MacNN Staff

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Comments

  1. lkrupp

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Yeah, right.

    An upgrade that Apple charges for is provided free? And this kid says it's legal? Right. I think this may be the undoing of this little cottage industry. Apple's gonna sue the c*** out of somebody and they'll deserve it too.

  1. ZinkDifferent

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    most likeyly...

    You need to understand that the apps Apple charges $20 for are installed already by the 1.1.3 update, and that the $20 only enables their display and function - hence, why the kid claims (or thinks) the update is legal.

    If anything, it is way deep in the grey zones.

    That said, it was only a matter of time until the hacking community would step into these waters, giving Apple legal opportunities to take more direct actions - wether Apple actually will do so remains to be seen.

  1. David Esrati

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    So sad...

    That I have to be tempted to go this route- just to get search capabilities on a $400 smartphone. Why can't I search my address book or calender? Still? Is it because Steve Jobs only has 10 friends in his contact book?

  1. tomodachi

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    /

    >> You need to understand that the apps Apple charges $20 for are installed already by the 1.1.3 update, and that the $20 only enables their display and function

    Yeah, so all the shareware and payware that you can download the full versions of, only requiring a serial number to "unlock" all their features, it's perfectly legal to circumvent the activation scheme, because you already have the full software ;-)

    If that's the reasoning behind the kid's claims that this is "legal"... well, him being a kid does explain a lot of things, doesn't it?

  1. Guest

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    did not work

    The program crashed on me during the installing OS phase, and I had to restore and update via iTunes.

  1. Guest

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    did not work ... update

    Well, it took a bit of doing and a few iJailbreak crashes, but it did finally work. Thanks to the devs.

  1. Terrin

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Don't see the problem

    I agree that it is legal. First, you own the iPod Touch and all the real estate contained within. Second, Apple didn't ask permission to install hidden software with the update on to your iPod. As such, I didn't enter into any agreement that I wouldn't unlock the software on the iPod that was installed without my permission.

    Surely, if you invited your neighbor into your house and he hides stuff in your house without permission you wouldn't fault yourself for keeping the property when it is later discovered.

  1. ViktorCode

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    not legal

    You own iPod touch and have the right to use software that was originaly installed there. You do not "own" software, you are licenced to use it. So, when Apple releases more apps under "pay to use, if you are early adopter" term, you can disagree but you can't say that it is legal to jailbreak and use these apps for free. Well, technically you can say that, but it does nothing except showing your ignorance.

  1. Terrin

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Whatever

    Yes, I may be ignorant, but I am 1) an attorney, and 2) I have studied intellectual property. What is your background?

    When you download the update from Apple, nowhere does it say you are installing hidden software. Accordingly, you made no agreement with Apple on what you would do with the software.

    Moreover, in most licenses have you agree to things that are not legally enforceable. Apple did not disclose the hidden software on the iPods. Accordingly, I would argue you can do whatever you want with the software that is on your computer without permission.

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