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Talkety to provide iPhone VOIP services

updated 04:20 pm EDT, Thu June 28, 2007

Talkety iPhone VOIP

The VOIP service Talkety states that it is now supporting the iPhone without special software, as required by other VOIP providers such as Skype. After signing up for one of Talkety's service plans, callers can simply visit talkety.com from their iPhone, and after logging in, the site will display Talkety contacts in a scheme similar to the iPhone's own. The site can dial both these and new numbers, and tap into a "recently dialed" list, or conference with up to 50 other people through a Pro service account.

For convenience the company will soon be providing an iSync plug-in, allowing Mac owners to ensure that their iPhone, iPod, Address Book and more will all have Talkety contact data. The software should be released as soon as the company has had a chance to test its code on a release-build iPhone.




by MacNN Staff

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Comments

  1. testudo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Great...

    ...unless Apple blocks VOIP ports in the firewall. Or the microphone isn't supported by the OS, just the phone (VOIP won't help if you can't talk), or until AT&T locks your phone, because you're not supposed to do VOIP traffic.

    But, above all, I love how their promoting this whole new service, then blurb it at the bottom with a "we'll release it once we've actually tested it", as in "we have no idea if it'll actually work or not"

  1. Johnny Niles

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Lrn2Read

    The blurb at the bottom was referring to the iSync plug-in they're working on. Not the VoIP service itself.

  1. testudo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Re: lrn2read

    Well, maybe they should verify their service will actually work rather then assuming it will. They still need to check that (a) the browser can send sound to the web site, and (b) the web site can return sound to the ear piece.

  1. vasic

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Why would AT&T do it?

    There is no reason why AT&T would want to block VoIP traffic. They have you on all-you-can-eat data plan, so they're getting plenty of your cash for the IP traffic. I can't think of anyone who would ever use their cellphone to make overseas calls directly (everyone I know uses calling cards). Since domestic long distance is free, AT&T isn't losing any money on VoIP.

    If they can access audio hardware, they can build software for VoIP. This just might work well.

  1. Johnny Niles

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Seriously.

    Lrn2Read testudo. Read the article again. What in that article suggests that they're only assuming their service will work? I think you're getting all confused by this sentence:

    "The software should be released as soon as the company has had a chance to test its code on a release-build iPhone."

    First of all the software they're talking about is the iSync plug-in. NOT THE VoIP SERVICE. Second, the mention of a release-build iPhone suggests that they have a pre-release build iPhone, not that they don't have an iPhone at all.

    Don't be so damn dense. Why would they announce their software if they have no idea if it works or not? Do you have any common sense at all?

  1. SimonB

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Answer from Talkety

    Hi,

    Talkety does not use VoIP to connect to the iPhone, but a call back mechanism that connects two or more phones via normal phone lines. VoIP is only used in between.

    The application is up and running - only our new iSync plugin has still to be tested. But Talkety can of course be used without it.

  1. thomasnefferson

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    EDGE

    ATT's EDGE network will never be able to handle voip traffic. ATT advertises EDGE's downstream speeds at 70-135 kilobits/sec. Upstream speeds are probably a fraction of this. Not to mention that actual speeds will not even come close to their advertised max. Voip requires at least 64 kpbs of dedicated bandwidth to ensure minimum quality of service.

    In response to the posts above, I don't think it would be too far off to suggest that Talkety has made this announcement with only the assumption it will work. If they had actually done their testing i imagine they'd have found it too unreliable for good quality voip service.

  1. armwt

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    why would ATT do it?

    There is no reason why AT&T would want to block VoIP traffic. They have you on all-you-can-eat data plan, so they're getting plenty of your cash for the IP traffic. I can't think of anyone who would ever use their cellphone to make overseas calls directly (everyone I know uses calling cards). Since domestic long distance is free, AT&T isn't losing any money on VoIP. ---

    Well, don't forget they charge you more for... I dunno, cell phone minutes?

    If you're using VOIP, whether on EDGE or WiFi, you're getting around the need to purchase more minutes from ATT.

    Seems like a simple enough reason to me.

  1. hayesk

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Re: seriously

    Nobody has a pre-release iPhone except a few AT&T employees. This service has to cobble local access numbers together using VOIP as the carrier in between, and if the quality is even as good as Skype's land-line to VOIP gateway, I would stay far away from this.

  1. testudo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Re: why

    There is no reason why AT&T would want to block VoIP traffic. They have you on all-you-can-eat data plan, so they're getting plenty of your cash for the IP traffic. I can't think of anyone who would ever use their cellphone to make overseas calls directly (everyone I know uses calling cards). Since domestic long distance is free, AT&T isn't losing any money on VoIP.



    Um, first, they DON'T want you using their data network. Not for VOIP, not for web, not for email, not for anything. The more you use their data network, the more it costs AT&T, and the less profit they make. Allowing VOIP traffic only increases your usage of their network (assuming its on the EDGE, and not WiFi).

    Second, as armwt mentioned, using VOIP means not calling on AT&T's network, which means they can't charge you for it, especially where they charge a lot, like overseas. (You can use calling cards overseas, but then who needs a cell phone at all). And US long distance isn't free, it comes off your monthly minute plans.

    On another note, thanks simonb for clearing up how the whole thing works (and not calling me an idiot instead).

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