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Apple: Boot Camp doesn\'t void warranty

updated 09:15 am EDT, Tue April 11, 2006

BC doesn\'t void warranty

Users of Apple's new Boot Camp beta technology can breathe easy. Apple has assured Intel Mac users that installing Boot Camp will not invalidate the warranty on their machines, according to PC Pro. "Installing Boot Camp does not invalidate your Apple warranty," a spokesperson for Apple UK confirmed. The report counters rumors and speculation that had begun circulating on its own tech support discussion boards as well as reports that some staff at Apple's retail stores had told some users that installing Boot Camp would negate the warranty on their MacBook Pros, according to the publication.




by MacNN Staff

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  1. GodsiPod

    Joined:

    0

    No need for dangerous BC

    Check how fast XP boots using Parallels virtualization software. 10 seconds!! http://godsipod.com/xponmac/ Run both OS X and XP at the same time.

  1. jarod

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    lol

    People actually thought the BootCamp will void a computer's warranty! LOL This is how highly people think of Mictoshit Wincrap! hahahahaaaaa

  1. testudo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    WTF?

    Who are the idiots who come up with these ideas? I mean, when was the last time Apple (or any company for that matter) released some software, with big hullaballoo and everything, only to turn around and say "Hey, you installed this software we put out, we no longer are going to cover your a**!"

    h***, if they could do that, they could just say "Anyone who has installed any version of OS X has broken their warranty and we are not supporting their computers..."

  1. Dr.Funkenstein

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Warranty vs Support

    It seems a lot of consumers misunderstand the difference between a warranty -- which offers protection against "manufacturing defects", and after-sale support -- which offers help with a product's usage or other consumer issues.

    When Apple says it won't support BootCamp, that only means that if you s**** up your hard drive or lose your data, they aren't responsible. If the hard drive STOPS SPINNING, then presumably the warranty coverage should kick in.

    It's the same with the iPod, when people started saying matter-of-factly, that the iPod only had a 90 warranty, when it was actually 90 days free tech support. Frankly, if you can't figure out how to use your iPod after 90 days, then you probably have other problems, like tying your shoes.

  1. jarod

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Dr.Funkenstein

    Right on! lolll

  1. hayesk

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Security risk? Please.

    Ha ha ha! Anyone who thinks that the camera is a corporate security risk is not thinking about this at all. Think about it:

    There are two perceived risks with a camera. The MacBook owner taking pictures with it, and someone hacking into it to take pictures. Let's look at those two things:

    The owner taking pictures - this is much bigger than a camera phone - you can't discretely take a picture without being noticed. Sneaking a tiny digital camera is a risk. Nobody's going to try it with a laptop when it's much easier to do with a $100 digital camera.

    Someone hacking into the MacBook and snapping a picture - if someone is clever enough to hack into your MacBook through corporate firewalls, etc. which do you think would be more important to them: - a picture of the user's face? - audio of what the user is talking about on the phone and to coworkers? - the actual data on the computer itself?

    The 2nd and 3rd things might prove useful which could be done on most laptops. Many laptops have microphones, but why aren't you labelling those as a security risk?

    How would a picture of the user be a greater risk than the other two?

  1. eswinson

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    XP

    Interestingly enough not having the right XP drivers may cause excessive wear and tear on certain pieces of hardware. Doesn't the optical audio IR light stay lit now when booted in XP?

  1. ApeInTheShell

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Hayesk

    Did you read the right article?

  1. testudo

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Re: security risk

    Ha ha ha! Anyone who thinks that the camera is a corporate security risk is not thinking about this at all.

    Yeah, all those companies and gov't agencies are idiots for banning cell phones and cameras. You tell them!

    The owner taking pictures - this is much bigger than a camera phone - you can't discretely take a picture without being noticed. Sneaking a tiny digital camera is a risk. Nobody's going to try it with a laptop when it's much easier to do with a $100 digital camera.

    Yeah, but, like a camera phone, it doesn't look like a camera. As such, it isn't going to be examined as closely as other devices. And what do you mean you can't 'discretely' take a picture. s**** that, you can discretely take a movie. Just start capturing, and turn the computer around. It's not like you're going to hold it up to your face to focus or anything.

    Someone hacking into the MacBook and snapping a picture - if someone is clever enough to hack into your MacBook through corporate firewalls, etc. which do you think would be more important to them: - a picture of the user's face? - audio of what the user is talking about on the phone and to coworkers? - the actual data on the computer itself?

    You're assuming they hack the computer through the firewall. However, you're more likely to get hacked OUTSIDE the work place, where then software is placed on your computer to take pictures, capture audio, etc. Take it in the next day, bingo, nice shot of the white board with that new toothpaste formula or soda marketing campaign!

    Finally, you also make the assumption that the computer would contain the data that's being discussed. That's not always the case. If you're in a secure building, there's no outside netowrk access. But, hey, now you've got the computer taking pictures and recording conversations.

  1. ShyGuy91284

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    What about BIOS flashing?

    I'm not sure (I don't have a Mac Intel), but don't you need to flash your BIOS's firmware to get it working? Although you probably can't flash the wrong firmware, what if say you did flash it, and the power died and caused your flash to fail part-way, turning it into a paperweight?

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