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PyMusique \"not about circumventing Apple\'s DRM\"

updated 01:05 pm EDT, Mon April 4, 2005

PyMusique interview

Forbes looks at the controversial iTunes client software for Linux in an article posted last week. Seventeen-year-old programmer Cody Brocious says that stripping the Digital Rights Management technology from iTunes songs happened more or less by accident. He first assumed that the copy protection was attached directly by the iTunes server itself. Had that been the case, he says, PyMusique would have left it intact, meaning the program would be subject to the same copy restrictions to which all iTunes users are subject. "This is not about circumventing Apple's DRM," he says. "It's about creating a good Linux client for iTunes." Brocious says PyMusique provides Apple with more customers without having to invest in developing its own software for Linux. "The solution is to work with us, not against us."




by MacNN Staff

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  1. legacyb4

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    By accident...

    And we are supposed to believe that?

  1. vickys-box

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Not about DRM?

    If it's not about circumventing DRM, then PyMusique should add the DRM. Oh, and let's not get into discussion about iTunes Music Store Terms of Use shall we?

  1. slytle

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    PyMusique should add DRM?

    What you suggest they do? Create their own DRM? They don't have access to the algorithms used to create the DRM, otherwise, DRM wouldn't work.


    .sly

  1. burger

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Oh no!

    Linux users are not allowed to listen to music, ever!

    If they do, it could undo the very fabric of existence! Stop them now!

  1. jpellino

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    the eddie haskell defense

    honest, mrs. cleaver, we were just playing some music. then lumpy here tripped over the drm cord we had run to the basement. gosh, we didn't know we were going to wipe out the drm... heck, gilbert was the one who asked us if he could hear it...

    I call 'bull' on this.

    * If this is all about linux, then as forbes says, why make a wintel client?
    * If this is easy enough so that leaving DRM intact would have been undone by someone else anyway, WHY BE THE LIGHTNING ROD? For cred? Are you somehow availed of free legal representation?
    * Even if it's only intended for fair use, there are ways to get your itunes to linux that do not violate the iTMS contract - why invent one that does violate the contract?

  1. shmoolie

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Why is it...

    that some people feel they can circumvent another company's software and programming and everything will be all right? ITunes is not an open source piece of software. This 17 year old kid needs to learn to respect others intellectual property. It doesn't matter how much he want to do something for the Linux community. The software isn't his to modify.

  1. scottnichol

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    not about their intention

    as innocent as they can claim to be, its not about what they intended the client to be used for, its really about what it could be used for. the fact that it delivers unprotected AAC files just opens the door wide for all the pirates and thieves that would want to use something like this for posting high quality DRM free music on P2P servies or other nefarious practices.

  1. sixcolors

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    DRM and You

    If you give someone money and they give you a product, that product is yours to do as you wish with. If that product is a license to listen to music then you can do that, you can s**** with the eq, you can turn the volume up really loud (be nice to your neighbors tho), you are basically buying the right to do everything with it but re-distribute it (in Canada, where I'm from, you can make as many copies on whatever format of media you wish, because the copyright holders get paid from a levy that is charged on the media [so you can't pay for a crime in this country, therefor you have already paid for the license to copy music] thus you can strip DRM too, if you want. No DMCA outside the US).

    In addition if Microsoft didn't encode music before they sent it and someone made a mac client you would all say 'jump for joy,' download the client and buy every song you could afford. It's not this guys fault that Apple has made a fundamental programming mistake: on the internet NEVER EVER TRUST THE CLIENT! I mean come on, doesn't anyone remember 1999 when everyone had an online store, and if you looked in the html they were passing the price in a hidden text field? A lot of people got paid to get new tv's, bbq's and dog food (yes they sold dog food over the net, and got VC to boot!).

    On and one more thing, the developers of some of that e-commerce software that trusted the client got sued! That's right they were liable for leaving serious flaws in the software. It's not that some evil hacker violated poor Apple, it's that Apple was negligent in designing it's DRM methods, and now it's being bypassed with some pretty simple code.

    By the way, iTunes is not open-source, this software is not iTunes, it's new software that communicates with a server, they reverse engineered the protocols, that's a right that you have in the US. Saying he shouldn't be allowed to make software that talks with Apple's server; that's like saying Mozilla should not be allowed to make browsers that talk to www.msn.com.

    Disclaimer: I like Apple Computers, I use OS X, I am a developer, I have nothing to do with this software, I am a AAPL shareholder, I am a reasonable person, mac users are generally zealots.

  1. sixcolors

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    RE: not about their inten

    "as innocent as they can claim to be, its not about what they intended the client to be used for, its really about what it could be used for. the fact that it delivers unprotected AAC files just opens the door wide for all the pirates and thieves that would want to use something like this for posting high quality DRM free music on P2P servies or other nefarious practices."

    Um, if I can recall you are not responsible for that others do. If you were we should all bust down the doors at our local CD stores and trash the place! After all they are sullying DRM free music to people to put on their p2p software and distribute to evil thieves everywhere!

    Grow the f*** up!

  1. Jonathan-Tanya

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    whiners

    quote: "This 17 year old kid needs to learn to respect others intellectual property."

    Apple needs to learn respect for 17 year old kids, or they will spend their years whining like you.

    c'mon folks, if its this easy, then its easy, easy, easy.

    Apple, you did a lousy, sloppy, quick job...you got caught with your pants down, now grow up.

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