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Microsoft granted \'double-click\' patent

updated 09:00 pm EDT, Wed June 2, 2004

MS patents \'double-click\'

Microsoft has been granted a , granted on April 27, 2004, is being protested by the New York-based Public Patent Foundation, as Microsoft last year said said "it would be seeking to improve earnings from technology which it claims it invented and would be using its patent portfolio to do so."

The abstract describes the patent: "A method and system are provided for extending the functionality of application buttons on a limited resource computing device. Alternative application functions are launched based on the length of time an application button is pressed. A default function for an application is launched if the button is pressed for a short, i.e., normal, period of time. An alternative function of the application is launched if the button is pressed for a long, (e.g., at least one second), period of time. Still another function can be launched if the application button is pressed multiple times within a short period of time, e.g., double click."




by MacNN Staff

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Comments

  1. OoklaTheMok

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    application button?

    What the heck is an application button? I'm used to double-clicking a mouse button...

  1. pdot

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Within the application

    I think this is referring to double-clicking within an app such as MS Word. Like how Apple apps gives you the option of holding down the mouse to get the contextual menu sometimes, this appears to be for multi-clicking.

  1. cageyjames

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Meh...

    No big deal. I think Microsoft and Apple need more of the patents to defend themselves against these lawsuits from small companies only set up to defend patents (SCO and the like). I don't like that they have to do so, but I understand it.

    Lawyers rule the world.

  1. Meövv

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    1.5 click

    What happened to the one-and-a-half click in Mac OS 9? That was a good way of getting certain things happen and I wish Apple couls implement that as an optional alternative to control-click or "right-click".

  1. brinj

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Apple had it first

    Apple has used double click for as long as they've had one button mice. Since MS "borrowed" the interface to overlay on DOS as Windows, they should hardly be entitled to a patent for something that was in common usage before they even utilized it.

    Do you really want your software costs to go up so that MS can collect royalties based on an estimate of how many double-clicks a given user will make during the average usage period of any given program?

  1. beeble

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    When did Windows come out

    Windows, not being the first gui, was not the first time the double click had been done. I'd like to see MS try and defend the prior art argument against this (mostly because they'd loose but I'm sure they say some very entertaining things in the process). How can they patent clicking a mouse when they didn't invent the mouse (and therefore the concept of clicking the button/s to do things).

  1. ender

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Out of Control

    The US patent office is out of control! The very first Mac has similar features. You click on a folder to select it, click-hold to be allowed to move it, double-click to open it. In some of the earliest Mac word processors you click on a word once to place the insertion point and double-click to select the entire word; and later you could triple-click to select the entire paragraph. And for how long now could you click-hold the back button in your web browser to get a pop-up list of previously visited web sites. Or let's put yet another twist on it. In OS 9, if you click on a file name, you select it. But if you click and immediately move the pointer away from the text you enter edit mode.

    All these are examples of prior art that is close enough to MS's patent application that it should have been declined on the basis of the uniqueness test.

  1. VadersCape

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Click Tax

    Microsoft will be instituting a multi-click tax effective August 1, 2004 GMT. Although all clicks executed prior to that date are excluded, all non-Windows OS manufacturers must immediately update their code to record multi-click operations and report them all to Microsoft on a monthly basis for billing purposes. Once in effect, users of non-Microsoft operating systems will be charged one cent for every double-click, two cents for every triple-click, five cents for every mouse chord and a dime per instance for all other multi-click activities. Users who reach the 10,000/100,000/1,000,000 multi-click actions per month plateaus will receive substantially discounted rates as detailed on Microsoft's licensing website. Users who already operate Microsoft operating systems or switch to them by August 1st can avoid the tax.

  1. cageyjames

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Xerox not Mac

    Should be angry. PARC had it before them. *shrug*

    As I said, better that Apple and MS get these before a "startup". I doubt we'll see MS try anything, but I do realize we all said this before FAT.

  1. Sebastien

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Your american tax dollars

    at work.

    I bet you guys feel all warm and fuzzy inside.

    But don't whine, you're the ones that put those people in power

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