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Rogue Amoeba releases Nicecast 1.0 for Mac OS X

updated 11:35 am EST, Mon December 8, 2003

Nicecast 1.0 for Mac OS X

Rogue Amoeba Software has released , a new application for Mac OS X that can be used to broadcast audio over the internet or other network: "Nicecast can help you create your own internet radio station or simply allow you to listen to your iTunes Music Library from anywhere in the world! You can use an audio player like iTunes to DJ hour after hour of your favorite music or just to let your friends hear that new song you've been working on. The included VoiceOver effect lets you insert radio-style commentary, right between songs." Nicecast is available for $50; a 20-min limited trial is available.




by MacNN Staff

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  1. MacNN.com Reader

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Price

    RogueAmoeba's site says this is $30 through the end of the year, then $40. Where did $50 come from? Typo? The store page says $30 too.

  1. MacNN.com Reader

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Nicecast...

    This is pretty great sounding if it delivers what it says...I wonder however, is this legal?? I though there were issues with streaming music stations over the net?

  1. MacNN.com Reader

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Demo?

    The price is wrong, yeah. But also, I've been using the intermediate builds of this, and "20-min limited trial" is a bit deceiving. You can use Nicecast fully for 20 minutes - then it overlays static on your broadcast (so you'll pay). If you quit and restart Nicecast, you get another 20 minutes.

  1. MacNN.com Reader

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    Re: Demo

    That's what I like in a demo. It shows you the full functionality, but it doesn't let you get away with not paying. Seems fair to me.

  1. MacNN.com Reader

    Joined: Dec 1969

    0

    ddr2

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